Roulette Star (Design by Evan Zodl)

Roulette Star (Design by Evan Zodl)

I folded one other modular star this week and I am pleasantly surprised with this particular design. Evan Zodl’s dainty star is very much inspired by Maria Sinayskaya’s modulars and comes with intricate folding but the surprise in this is the so-easy assembly!

Usually, it is the assembly which requires pegs and holders to keep units in place, but this one is as easy as they come. Duo colored paper works best for this model, especially to make use of the center design. This is a lower intermediate design, but beginners with practice in folding, will get by easily with the help of Evan’s video instructions.

I have used my go-to pack of small-ish 4 inch Japanese Washi papers to fold this design. You can use normal kami paper or even wrapping paper to fold this design. Evan suggests to use 4 inch sized paper at least to fold this design, with the resulting model measuring around 6 inches in size.

How to fold this design:

Take a look at Evan Zodl‘s detailed tutorial here:

Celtic Brooch (Design by José Meeusen)

Celtic Brooch (Design by José Meeusen)

I am trying to get started on a regular routine once again in folding paper. To start out, I picked a pretty, festive looking modular design which I think is one of the perfect ones for this Holiday Season.

It’s José Meeusen’s Celtic Brooch which is folded from 12 sheets of duo colored paper. To make it an interesting combination, you can try with 2 differently colored papers so that you get an alternating color combination around the design. If you choose to use single side colored paper, the white side will form a jagged center circle – which you can see in the tutorial video below.

Tuttle publishing has released a variety of small sized paper packs recently, which you can find on Amazon. I have used the Japanese Washi paper design from these. They come in packs of 300 sheets mostly, and duo colored, which make them perfect for modulars. Each of the sheets measure 4 inches in size and when assembled, this brooch design measures approx 5.5 inches.

How to fold this design:

Evan Zodl has created and uploaded a very detailed and helpful video on folding the 12 individual units and assembling them. The creases and reference points most importantly are clearly marked and explained which make this an easy-to-follow video even for beginners.

Pom Pom Bear

Pom Pom Bear

With the pandemic still raging and a toddler to take care of at home, I’ve been trying to get into more crafting and origami during the late evenings and night (which is my ‘me time’).

I found this book – Pom Pom Animals by Trikotri – and I liked it almost immediately. It has 45 different tutorials to make your own animals such as a Brown bear, hedgehogs, polar bear, red fox, rabbits, owl and more. All of these are incredibly cute and her instructions are easy to follow. All you need is a pom pom maker and wool of the desired color – and you are set!

The first tutorial in the book is a brown bear. This was my first attempt, and according to the book, this is one of the basic models. There is only one color of wool required and a bit of black felting / roving wool to make the nose and nose-mouth markings.

I decided to make a Winnie the Pooh bear using the book’s instructions as a guideline. The book tells you exactly how many rolls of wool is required on the pom pom maker and the color to use. It even indicates the points where one has to knot the twine to hold the pom pom strands together! For a newbie like me, this was perfect! I have never felted wool before but the instructions and details on forming the nose and the mouth markings are very clear and I found these easy to follow. I made my Winnie the Pooh bear a brooch using a brooch back pin.

The overall size of the finished bear is 3.5 inches across, 3 inches in length and 2.5 in height. It fits exactly in the palm of your hands. I used the required 65 mm pom pom maker as described in the book and purchased the set of pom pom makers from Michaels.

I enjoyed this DIY pom pom craft and I see myself doing a few more of these. I think these would make a fabulous addition to my daughter’s nursery decor, too.

 

 

8 Pointed Shuriken (Design by Ancella Simoes)

8 Pointed Shuriken (Design by Ancella Simoes)

Shurikens literally are “hand released blades” and historically there have been two types of shurikens – the bo shuriken which are thin narrow blades and the hira shuriken which are plates having anywhere between 2 to 8 spikes radiating out of the center.

This wheel blade design of mine has 8 pointed spikes – a happo shuriken. I folded it using 4 inch square sheets of paper which are duo colored. This has given it a nice color combination within the folds.

The assembly is quick and easy – each unit has to be placed within the outer flaps of the next unit and so on. There is no need for glue to hold this model together, unless you prefer to hang it, then glue would make it more sturdy.

The idea behind this design is Paolo Bascetta’s ring which, I find, has a brilliant, easy assembly and I wanted to replicate this process albeit with differently folded units.

Jack O’Lantern (Design by Edward Mistretta)

 

Jack O’Lantern (Design by Edward Mistretta)

In the spirit of Halloween, I folded this nice Jack O’Lantern designed by Edward Mistretta. He generously shared the diagram on his Instagram.  This design is easy to fold with no complex folding sequence involved. Having said that however, one should be precise with the pre-creases so that the model folds easily.

I prepared this paper by using Japanese Washi Paper measuring 4 inches in size and sticking a sheet of orange ombre colored tissue paper on the other side for the pumpkin colored duo effect.