Buddha (Design by Dang Viet Tan)

Buddha
Buddha (Design by Dang Viet Tan)

 

This is my second attempt at folding this amazing model as a gift to one of my good friends here in Chicago, this year. My initial attempt was made using tant paper and you can see the outcome of the folding here. However, this time, I thought I would fold the model using Metallic Tissue Foil paper which I purchased on Nicolas Terry’s Pack Tissue-foil Papers – 20 sheets – 30x30cm (11.8″x11.8″)“.

Folding Buddha with this Metallic Foil paper is much better and the overall look and feel post completion is very good, too. I like the texture of the paper and in the right kind of lighting, this model looks really very pretty.

Paper to Use:
You can give this model a try with paper which is easily shaped. I personally found Tissue Foil much better than Tant paper. Regular kami will not give you the desired look and feel once you are done with the folding. Make sure you have few pins or paper clips handy to keep the lotus formation in shape. I found paperclips to be most helpful in this.

You need two sheets of paper – for the model folded by me above, I used two square sheets, each measuring 30 cms. I chose a Gold color for Buddha and a bronze color for the lotus in which he is seated in.

Gift set Origami Deluxe: Book + 130 sheets

Folding this Model:
The diagrams for this model are available in Vietnam Origami Group’s first published Origami book. It took me around 2.5 hours to fold this model and a little more to shape it properly. This is a terrific design to fold and I am very happy with the way it has come out after completing it.

For those of you who are not aware, Vietnam Origami Group (VOG) has published a second book via Nicolas Terry – #7 VOG 2 Origami.vn. This has great collection of designs to fold, too.

The Last Waltz (Design by Neal Elias)

The Last Waltz (Design by Neal Elias)
The Last Waltz (Design by Neal Elias)

It was my good friend’s birthday this month and I knew had to get her something really special for it. I remembered she always mentioned this particular design and how much she liked it whenever the talk of Origami or other hobbies came up. So, I decided to fold Neal Elias’ the Last Waltz for her as a gift.

This is a design I had first folded some two years ago. It was a challenging model at that time as I had only just started folding slightly complex designs and this was my first box pleat based model, too.

This time around however, I didn’t use kraft paper but instead chose a fine printed paper which was very similar to Lokta and pasted a sheet of a dull gold tissue foil paper in order to get the duo-colored effect. It was also a lot easier to fold the second time around. 🙂

Paper to use:
Since I wanted that the completed model be at least some 6 inches in height, I cut out sheets measuring 12″ X 36″ approximately. After pasting and allowing the paper to set, it took me about 3.5 hours to fold this model with an additional half an hour to properly shape the hair, the skirt and the arms.

I really enjoyed folding this model once again and am glad that I chose a prettier paper this time around to take advantage of the color change effect.

How to fold Neal Elias’ The Last Waltz:
Sara Adams has recorded a really good instructional video on this design – it’s 5 videos long but she explains all the steps, including the Elias stretch and that ‘oh-so-tricky’ fold for the groom’s legs really well.

Oh, and my friend loved the gift, in the end and was really happy with it. Here are some pics from her Birthday, too – with the gift. 😀

The Birthday Girl - Nisha
The Birthday Girl - Nisha
The Birthday Girl & Me
The Birthday Girl & Me

Buddha (Design by Dang Viet Tan)

Buddha (Design by Dang Viet Tan)
Buddha (Design by Dang Viet Tan)

I have been rather lazy in folding these past few months and I always think that I will improve with the coming weekend and get back into the groove. Well there have been many weekends which have gone by and by now, you would know how many models I have actually folded. 😉

Last weekend, however, I picked up the #5 VOG: 50 hours of Origami + and started looking for something to fold – and Dang Viet Tan’s Buddha caught my eye. Looking at it, you would think it would be a ~100 odd step design with numerous complex folds – but this one is different. It takes 2 sheets of paper and the folding sequence is quick and not at all complicated.

Paper to use:
I used 2 sheets of square shaped, duo-colored Tant paper, each measuring 30 cms in size. I chose these 2 colors – yellow and maroon – as I wanted to match the colors / shades of the attire the Buddhist Monks wear. Using tant paper did not give me any problems while folding this model, given the paper’s thickness. I have also seen this model folded with tissue foil paper, so if you are comfortable with using that, you can do so.

Folding Dang Viet Tan’s Buddha:
The folding instructions consists of 2 sequences – 1 each for the Lotus and the Buddha. The instructions are available in #5 VOG: 50 hours of Origami + and you can buy it from Nicolas Terry’s Origami-Shop.com.

This is a very interesting design to fold and I am pretty happy with the result.

The Ghost ‘La Fantasmita’ (Design by Manuel Sirgo)

The Ghost 'La Fantasmita' (Design by Manuel Sirgo)

Happy Halloween everybody! 🙂

Since it is that time of the year, I thought I’d fold something befitting the theme – so I chose this model by Manuel Sirgo. This origami ghost design is pretty simple to fold involving valley and mountain folds along with a few rabbit ear folds. There is a bit of shaping involved in the end, so you might want to try wet folding this design, too.

I did not attempt wet folding, but instead have just shaped the model with my (dry) fingers.

How to fold the model:

This model is surprisingly pretty simple and quick to fold. Consisting of 20 steps in all, you can refer to the diagrams which Manuel Sirgo has generously shared with everyone.

Paper to Use:

You can fold this model with almost any kind of paper since there are few folds and none which are complicated. I have used a solid white colored kami paper measuring approximately 6 inches in size. You can also shape the paper in the way you would like in order to give the ghost a more eerie and ‘floating’ look.

Have a spooky halloween and have fun!

Crucifix (Design by Quentin Trollip)

Crucifix (Design by Quentin Trollip)
Crucifix (Design by Quentin Trollip)

This amazing design of The Crucifix has been on my my to-do folding list for quite a while but I kept pushing it away since I thought I’d wait for Good Friday. Being Holy Week, I did attempt folding this model and I did find it quite complex. However, I wasn’t able to finish folding it in one day.

This is a complex model to fold – there are numerous sinks, layers and reverse folds and the model gets quite thick with these incorporated. The designer – Quentin Trollip – did mention that Kami or Foil paper could be used to fold this model and that it is best wet-folded. However, my attempt was with Tant paper and I did not wet fold this model, at all.

I took approx 6 hours spanning 2 days to fold this model and the reason why I couldn’t continue this at one stretch is because I got stuck at many places during the folding sequence. I do follow the practice of ‘giving up’ for a short period of time as I tend to get past the sticky points in the folding sequence much quicker at the second go.

Pack Discovery - 25 squares

Paper to use:
The designer Quentin Trollip suggests that a paper measuring 35 cms should be chosen and it should be uni colored. I have folded my rendition using 35 cms square of Brown Tant paper which I had purchased from Origami-shop.com – Pack Discovery – 25 squares. This tant paper is colored brown on both sides so it is very convenient.

How to fold the Crucifix:
The diagram to this model is available in Quentin Trollip’s books – #4 Origami Sequence, in Quentin Trollip: Selected Works (BOS Booklet No 67) as well as in a CD-ROM – London Origami.

There are 66 steps as per the diagram in the book and this number does not include the repetitions.

This is my first fold of this model and I am quite pleased with the result. I did not wet-fold this model and have only incorporated minimal shaping.

Happy Easter!