Snowflake (Design by Dennis Walker)

Snowflakes (Design by Dennis Walker)
Snowflakes (Design by Dennis Walker)
Snowflake (Design by Dennis Walker)
Snowflake (Design by Dennis Walker)

I came across this Snowflake design on Sara Adams’ website and found it really pretty. Even though there is still some time to go before the holiday season actually begins, I couldn’t stop myself from giving this one a try. 🙂

You can cut out a hexagon from a square sheet of paper or from an A4 size paper. Once this part is done, you can start folding your snowflake.

Paper to use:

It is advisable to start off with tracing paper or tissue paper which you use for gift wrapping. These sheets are fine, easy to fold and if you prop up the snowflake against the window pane once done, you will be able to see the sunlight filter through the layers of folds giving it a really pretty look.

I used a 10.5 inch square sheet of tissue paper – remnant from a previous origami project. From this square sheet I cut out a hexagon, with each of its sides measuring approx 5 inches in length. I did this by following one of Sara’s instructional Video of cutting a Hexagon out of a square. The final model measures about 5 to 6 inches (approx) across.

How to Fold the Snowflake:

You can fold this pretty snowflake either by following the diagrams available on Dennis Walker’s website or by following Sara Adams’ detailed instructional video on this model.

It takes around 15 minutes to fold this model without taking into account the time involved in cutting the hexagon. It is pretty simple and can be folded by beginners too.

Now to gear up for ‘The most wonderful time of the Year’!

Origami Spirals! (Designs by Tomoko Fuse & Jeff Beynon)

Origami Spiral (Design by Jeff Beynon)
Origami Spiral (Design by Jeff Beynon)
Origami Spirals (Designs by Tomoko Fuse)
Origami Spirals (Designs by Tomoko Fuse)

I decided to experiment with spirals this week and chose 2 designs to fold. One of these were simple spirals folded out of strips of paper and the other was the well known ‘Spring into action’ origami which I folded from an A4 sized printer paper (re-sized).

Origami Spirals (Tomoko Fuse’s)

As you can see from the image accompanying this post, I used duo colored construction paper which were actually remnants from earlier origami projects! 🙂 I started out by thinking I would experiment with the folds first and then go on to fold longer spirals. But then, these started coming out decently well on my first try itself… so I decided to make multiple spirals from the same remnant paper bits. 😀

The paper I used here measures 9 inches by 3 inches. You can variate the size of the paper for this particular design as long as you keep it rectangular at a 1:3 (breadth: length) ratio, in my opinion.

‘Spring into action’ origami (Jeff Beynon’s):

For this, I used an A4 sized paper (11 inches by 8.5 inches), of which, I trimmed the breadth to 5.875 inches (length remaining the same). I did struggle a lot to divide this ‘now re-sized’ sheet into 12 parts horizontally and then into 6 parts vertically. Once I got this part done properly, it became a real hassle to twist the folds to form this spiral. I daresay, it will be sometime before I attempt to fold this particular design again! 😛

How to fold this model:
Barbabellatje has uploaded a very good video on YouTube depicting the steps in folding the ‘Spiring into action’ Origami spiral.

Origami Baby Booties

Origami Baby Booties
Origami Baby Booties

One of my best pals – Priyanka – has her baby due next month and since I won’t be able to see her bundle of joy till early next year (sigh!), I thought of folding this adorable pair of baby booties just for her (her baby, rather)!

I used construction paper instead of origami paper to fold these. The design is pretty simple and instructions are pretty easy to follow, too. I think a total of 11 or 12 folds gets you a completed bootie and this includes the folds to shape the bootie!

I used square sheets of paper measuring approx 8.5 inches (duo-colored); for the ‘laces’ I used thin tissue paper cut into narrow strips and once creating a simple knot in the front of each bootie, I tied the two ends into a separate knot. Well, I found this easier than making a pretty bow out of 4 strands of paper as it kept coming apart.

Origami Bouvardia box (Design by Tomoko Fuse)

Origami Bouvardia box (Design by Tomoko Fuse)
Origami Bouvardia box (Design by Tomoko Fuse)

This is the first time I tried my hands at folding an origami box. I decided to fold this for a friend of mine as a gift and thought that this was a pretty concept (and design, of course) to try out!

I referred to the book – Fabulous Origami Boxes (Tomoko Fuse) – for the design and instructions for this particular model. You can check out more details about this book as well as a review about it on the page – Book Reviews.

What you need:

For this particular model, I used construction paper (cut down to a 9” approx. square) thinking it will add to the ‘soft feeling’ of the design.

For the ‘lid’ – you need 4 square sheets of paper sized 7” to 9”. These can be of different color each, 2 sheets each of a different color or simply all of the same color.

For the ‘body’ – you need 4 more square sheets of paper the same size as used for the lid of the box. The folding is a lot easier than the folding of the lid sections and can be done in a matter of a few mins in total.

The beauty of Fuse’s origami box designs is that, once you get the hang of the basic folds required for a plain box, you can fold almost any decorative pattern for the lid, that too in various combinations. This particular model is taken from pages 51 to 55 from her book.

One must be aware though, that the decorative bouvardia, lily, hydrangea, crane or whatever else you choose, is ‘fixed’ or a part of the lid itself i.e. that section you are putting together to form the lid of the box. Hence, there is a limit to the kinds of patterns you are thinking of incorporating onto your box.

Origami Book (Design by David Brill)

Book (Design by David Brill)
An Origami Book (Design by David Brill)
An Origami Book Mark
An Origami Book Mark

This is one very simple model from David Brill. You can make a ‘box’ spined book or a simple bound book.

What you need:
A square sheet of paper, single – side colored. This can be of any size of your choice. I have used a 6″ square sheet of Origami Paper here.

A Single – side colored paper is required, as the “white” side serves as the pages of the book once the model is completed.

How to fold this model:
YouTube.com has got some really good contributors for this model. I have found this video by Marigami pretty helpful.

Tips:
1. Avoid using thick paper (in case you aren’t using Origami paper) as this will make it difficult for you to fold the model.
2. Avoid using flimsy wrapping paper, too as this will not fold and form well.
3. You can make a book mark using this (as shown) or even a bookcase by folding a dozen of these books and stacking them on a bookcase. This video by Marigami ,will help you fold an Origami Bookcase: