Icosahedron Sonobe (Design by Tomoko Fuse)

Icosahedron Sonobe

I’m back to folding this summer, and I started out with a modular design from our favorite – Tomoko Fuse. Her designs are always interesting and with the right color combinations in paper, one can fold pretty kusudama.

For this particular design, it takes about 3 hours to fold and assemble at moderate pace. The individual units themselves are quite easy to fold, so its a good model to fold for folders with a little experience in folding, too.

Paper to use:
I used regular Kami paper, each of the sheets measuring 3 inches in size. These were 30 square sheets in all and single side colored. One has to start with the white side down in order to have the white color appear in between like shown in the image accompanying this post.

How to Fold the Icosahedron Sonobe:
There are many instructional videos on youtube for this model and the one I referred to and found very helpful is Tadashimori’s Instructional video. His explanations are clear and steps shown are very simple to follow.

Hope you enjoy folding this model!

Fiery Dragon (Design by Kade Chan)

Fiery Dragon (Design by Kade Chan)
Fiery Dragon (Design by Kade Chan)

Its been a long time since I folded dragons and this time I have attempted Kade Chan’s Fiery Dragon. This is my first attempt and I am quite pleased with it. I plan to fold my second rendition with metallic tissue paper so that it gives a better look when finished.

This model depends a lot on the shaping you do at the end of the folding sequence along with the kind of paper you use to achieve this. Starting with a larger sized paper is always helpful since the folds become a lot easier especially when sinks and rabbit folds are involved.

Paper to Use:
It is best to use pliable, easy to shape paper such as Tissue-Foil paper or Washi which can be easily shaped and bent to give form to the finished model. For my first attempt, I used the commonly found Tracing paper which made folding easier but shaping would be a lot better had I used Washi or tissue-foil paper. The size of the paper was a 26″ square – tracing paper which is very fine, allows for complicated folds without having to worry about the paper tearing off at stress points in the model.

How to Fold the Fiery Dragon:
Kade Chan has a wonderful blog, where he shares diagrams, tips as well as instructional videos (of his designs) made by origami enthusiasts all over the world, who have sought his permission for the instructional videos, of course. On his blog, he has shared the photo-diagrams of the finished model, clear diagrams of the folding sequence as well as multiple Instructional videos to help with folding this amazing model.

This model is a lot of fun to fold and is definitely worth the time. It took me 3 days with 3 hours spent per day to finish folding this model.

Clover Kusudama (Design by Maria Sinayskaya)

Clover Kusudama (Design by Maria Sinayskaya)
Clover Kusudama (Design by Maria Sinayskaya)

I folded a kusudama after a very long time and it took me about 4 hours in all to fold and assemble this design. The model itself looks complicated with the layered or frilly look but the individual units are pretty easy to fold once you’ve got the hang of it. I usually do not fold kusudama designs since they are time consuming and monotonous. But this time around, I found this pretty pattern and thought I would give it a try. These Kusudama designs look pretty when hung from a height or can be used as table decoration in the house.

Paper to use:
I have used 30, 3 inch square sheets of single side colored Kami paper to fold the model. I think this is the ideal size of paper to use as larger sized sheets would mean larger ‘edges’ (those half cube structures which you seen in the design) between the folds and this would make the model less compact. It is easier to manage the assembly with the units folded from these smaller sheets, too. You do not require any paperclips or pins to hold the in-progress model together while you assemble it all; you just require patience. One can use wrapping paper or any similar textured paper to fold this model. Tissue paper or extremely fine paper should be avoided.

How to fold the Clover Kusudama:
Maria Sinayskaya has diagrammed the folding sequence and also provided links to the instructional video recorded explaining this folding process. Further, she also includes color photographs of the finished model in various paper color combinations to give folders an idea of the kind of paper to use.

I found the video by Jo Nakashima pretty clear and very helpful especially where the assembly process is concerned and therefore I thought I would share it with you all, too. Jo makes the extra effort of cross referencing each step in the diagrammed folding sequence with that of the step in the instructional video, too.

12 Point Flower Tower (Design by Chris K. Palmer)

12 point Flower Tower (Design by Chris K. Palmer)
12 point Flower Tower (Design by Chris K. Palmer)

This is one model which I have been trying to fold in the last few weeks. My first attempt failed miserably with me not being able to collapse the first layer itself. This is the tricky part since the paper simply refuses to stay put at times, when folding it all around.

I gave this design another go last weekend and was pleasantly surprised that I was able to get through the first layer in two tries. What I did differently this time around was to make sure that the pre-creases were firm and sharp. I think this this helped a lot, as the paper started falling into place along the creases made.

Once you get through the first layer, the second and third are pretty much alright since you would already know how to nudge the paper into place. If you start off with a large sized paper, you can have multiple layers.

The Origami artist who has designed this wonderful model – Chris Palmer – has himself made an instructional video with Jeremy Shafer and he explains the steps and pre-creasing clearly and also provides tips on what to expect and how to go about the folding sequence.

Paper to Use:
Tant or craft paper measuring approx. 15 inches in size, duo-colored. You can also Kraft paper to fold this model. Extremely thin or fine tissue paper would not go for this model, since there are numerous folds and you need a strong paper which will not give way with the folding.

How to fold:
Jeremy Shafer has recorded and shared a great video of Chris Palmer himself teaching the folding sequence for this amazing 12 point Flower Tower. It is extremely detailed with very helpful hints along the way.

Braided Corona Star (Design by Maria Sinayskaya)

Braided Corona Star
Braided Corona Star (Design by Maria Sinayskaya)

 

I folded this braided star this weekend by following Sara Adams’ instructional video on her site. This is a pretty easy to fold design and you can fold it with almost any kind of paper available. Contrasting colors will make it look great and I chose a maroon and rose colored combination of Tant paper for my rendition.

Paper to Use:

You can use any kind of paper you have, contrasting colors are preferred. I have used 7.5 inch square sheets of Tant paper to fold this model and I used 8 sheets in all – 4 sheets of the Maroon color and 4 sheets of the rose colored paper. The braided star is quick to fold and one can easily interlock the various units, too.

 

How to fold Maria Sinayskaya’s Braided Corona Star:

Sara Adams has recorded a very good instructional on folding this pretty model. The directions are clear and she gives a clear perspective of the finished model vs. the size of the paper used. In her video, she has used 8 sheets of 3 in square Kami papers and the finished model is approx. 4 in in size.