Tag Archives: Complex origami

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz)

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz)

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz)

This is one model which has been lying unfinished for months… so this weekend I thought I’d finish the folding sequence and see how my rendition would come out. I found this model a bit difficult to fold, to tell you honestly, and I had to thrice re-open the model entirely during my folding!

What drew me to fold this model in the first place is the mane – I really liked the way the mane of the unicorn is shaped to give it a majestic look. I wanted to fold this model in white paper to maintain the ‘pure’ look a unicorn has, hence the selection of white duo-colored tant paper.

This design has a lot of sinks, rabbit ears and an unheard of (at least for me) – a hidden ‘gusset’ which had me looking up the meaning and technique online. With 81 steps in all, this model is complex and is meant for experienced folders. The shaping of the mane, tail and the body requires wet folding and a lot of patience. 🙂

Paper to use:
I have folded my rendition of the model in Tant paper measuring 35 cms in size – square, colored white on both sides. This model is complex by nature and requires shaping – especially for the mane. The folds involved in folding this model are sinks, reverse folds, rabbit ears and a hidden gusset.

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz)

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz) - Another View

How to fold this model:
The diagrams to this model are available in Román Díaz’s book – #3 Origami Essence – which is available at Nicolas Terry’s Origami Shop. This book has a lot of models which are really pretty and varied and a lot of them have color changes incorporated which makes it looks really great.

This is my first fold of this model and I am quite content with the result especially since I got stuck in the course of the folding sequence many times.

Yellowtail (Farmed) (Design by Katsuta Kyohei)

Yellowtail (Farmed) (Design by Katsuta Kyohei)

Yellowtail (Farmed) (Design by Katsuta Kyohei)

I have seen a few folds of this model on Flickr recently which tempted me to give folding this model a try. This is the first design of Katsuta Kyohei I attempted and this is also my first fold.

I have been wanting to fold this design for quite sometime now and for some reason have always been pushing it away – either the appropriate paper, time, and a load of other distractions. Choosing to fold this model on a lazy Sunday was a good decision because it felt good that I actually did end up folding a complex model instead of an easier one.

I am very happy with the way my rendition of Katsuta Kyohei’s Yellowtail Farmed fish has come out; this was my first fold of this design, too. 🙂

Paper to use:
This design makes use of color changes (see the belly of the fish) – so it would be wise to select paper which is duo colored i.e. colored both sides and one side preferably colored a different shade. For my folding, I used metallic Tissue foil paper which is considerably fine and makes it easy to give the final shaping touches. I had purchased this paper from Paper Source a few months ago.

If you do not have Tissue foil with you, I’d suggest kraft paper which is colored on both sides (different colors). The common origami paper will not give it a nice finish once you are done with your folding so that’s why I wouldn’t recommend that you use it. Washi paper might be a good option, but I haven’t given it a try. So, if you do, do let me know.

The finished model you see in the accompanying image has been folded from 35 cm sized square sheet of tissue foil paper. It has a slightly darker silvery-grey color on the other side which makes it quite alright to use in color changing models.

How to fold this model:
Katsuta Kyohei’s Yellowtail farmed fish diagrams are published in Origami Tanteidan Magazine # 116 – Vol 20, 2009. Other than this source, I do not know of any books in which it has been published. You can purchase the book (Vol 20, Issues 115 – 120) from Origami House Japan.

This is indeed a very nice model to fold and having ~83 steps its for folders who are comfortable with folding intermediate and slightly complex origami.

Rat (Design by Eric Joisel)

Rat (Eric Joisel)

Rat (Eric Joisel)

A new book – which is a joint effort by his friends at MFPP (French Origami Association – Mouvement Français des Plieurs de Papiers) and Nicolas Terry (of Origami-shop.com) – was released a week ago. This contained diagrams of Eric Joisel’s designs as well as write-ups and never before published pictures of him and his work.

I ordered this book – Eric Joisel – as soon as it was released and I just received it yesterday in the mail. I am absolutely pleased with the book and the contents / diagrams. Even though it is in the French language, I think it is a very good keep-sake book, especially since it is a tribute to Eric Joisel.

Eric Joisel

Paper to use:
I have folded this rat from a 25 cm square sheet of Tant paper which is brown on both sides (duo-colored). I have tried folding this rat with a smaller sheet of paper, too and found it pretty much alright.

How to Fold Eric Joisel’s Rat:
I have referred to the diagrams in the newly published book – Eric Joisel – in order to fold this. You would also be aware that Sara Adams of Happyfolding.com has also recorded and shared a very good instructional video.

In addition to these sources, you will also find the diagrams on Eric Joisel’s site. There will be directions / notes on how to reach the diagrams on that page when you visit the site.

Crucifix (Design by Quentin Trollip)

Crucifix (Design by Quentin Trollip)

Crucifix (Design by Quentin Trollip)

This amazing design of The Crucifix has been on my my to-do folding list for quite a while but I kept pushing it away since I thought I’d wait for Good Friday. Being Holy Week, I did attempt folding this model and I did find it quite complex. However, I wasn’t able to finish folding it in one day.

This is a complex model to fold – there are numerous sinks, layers and reverse folds and the model gets quite thick with these incorporated. The designer – Quentin Trollip – did mention that Kami or Foil paper could be used to fold this model and that it is best wet-folded. However, my attempt was with Tant paper and I did not wet fold this model, at all.

I took approx 6 hours spanning 2 days to fold this model and the reason why I couldn’t continue this at one stretch is because I got stuck at many places during the folding sequence. I do follow the practice of ‘giving up’ for a short period of time as I tend to get past the sticky points in the folding sequence much quicker at the second go.

Pack Discovery - 25 squares

Paper to use:
The designer Quentin Trollip suggests that a paper measuring 35 cms should be chosen and it should be uni colored. I have folded my rendition using 35 cms square of Brown Tant paper which I had purchased from Origami-shop.com – Pack Discovery – 25 squares. This tant paper is colored brown on both sides so it is very convenient.

How to fold the Crucifix:
The diagram to this model is available in Quentin Trollip’s books – #4 Origami Sequence, in Quentin Trollip: Selected Works (BOS Booklet No 67) as well as in a CD-ROM – London Origami.

There are 66 steps as per the diagram in the book and this number does not include the repetitions.

This is my first fold of this model and I am quite pleased with the result. I did not wet-fold this model and have only incorporated minimal shaping.

Happy Easter!

Ringed Tailed Lemur (Design by Román Díaz)

Ringed Tailed Lemur (Design by Román Díaz)

Ringed Tailed Lemur (Design by Román Díaz)

This is one of the designs which I had started folding a couple of weeks ago but got distracted with new paper and books and left it mid way. 🙂

I have begun to leave a lot of models folded only half-way through so I have now decided not to start off on any new designs or folding until I wrap up those.

This is a model from Román Díaz’s book – #3 Origami Essence – and is tagged as a level 4 category of designs. It is slightly complex with the numerous layered folds, rabbit ears and shaping involved. There are 61 steps in all, and this includes the shaping.

The model requires a lot of shaping at the end in order to give it a slightly 3D look. Hence, the paper you select for this design must be ‘flexible’ and allow for shaping without breaking / tearing apart at the edges. This is especially important because when you are at the end of the folding sequence, you will find that there are man layers that you need to fold through and tuck in, which if you have selected plain Kami or thicker variety, will make it very difficult.

 

I have not wet-folded my rendition of Román Díaz’s Ring-tail Lemur. Instead, I have selected special washi paper – Deluxe Washi BROWN – 10 sheets – which I purchased from origami-shop.com.

This paper is extremely ‘shapable’ and you do not need to wet-fold at all. However, errors in folding are quick to show as the gold foil on the reverse layer peels off with tension. So it’s a good idea to practice your folding before trying with this sort of paper.

DSC_0016

Paper to use:
While Román Díaz, in his book, mentioned that this design of his can be folded with double-tissue paper which is Duo colored i.e. beige on one side and black on the other side, I have used Duo-colored deluxe washi paper which is gold foiled on one side and chocolate brown on the other side. This paper measures 35 cms square and the final model (post folding), measure approx 7 inches in height (taking into account the curling tail) and 3.5 inches across.

How to fold the Ringed Tailed Lemur:
Diagrams to this model are available in Román Díaz’s book – #3 Origami Essence. The book is incredible and will make a good Origami book collection. There are many models to fold from this book for all levels of complexity. JM Tutorials has also created a helpful tutorial on this model, you can find it on his YouTube channel.