Eagle Ray (Design by Satoshi Kamiya)

Eagle Ray (Design by Satoshi Kamiya)
Eagle Ray (Design by Satoshi Kamiya)

I wanted to fold something different this week, so I decided to fold Satoshi Kamiya’s Eagle Ray from his book – Works of Satoshi KAMIYA. I have not folded anything from this book, to tell you honestly, besides the ‘Yellow Bird‘. I find almost all of the models pretty intricate, complex and time consuming to hold. So I end up closing the book and looking for something else to fold.

Paper to use:
In the book, it is suggested that a square sheet of paper measuring 15cm x 15cm be used for this model. I used common Kami paper as this is my first fold of this model. You can try folding this with tant or any other thin paper of your choice, too. The kami paper I used in the image above is single-side colored i.e. grey on one side and white on the other. You need to start folding with the white side facing upwards (towards you). I have wet folded my rendition of the model to give it a more ‘swimming’ or ‘flowing’ look. This is of course, an optional step.

How to fold this model:
Works of Satoshi KAMIYA

As you would be very well aware by now, Satoshi Kamiya does not wish to have any instructional videos created / recorded of his work. So, in order to fold this model, you would need to have the book. This book, Works of Satoshi KAMIYA might I mention, is well worth it because it has a diagrams to a lot of complex models. The diagrams to the Bahamut Dragon, Ancient Dragon and Divine Boar are also included in this book. However, I should add that this book is for experienced folders only. There are no simple and lower intermediate models in it, at all – all of the models are complex.

Orangutan (Design by Quentin Trollip)

Orangutan (Design by Quentin Trollip)
Orangutan (Design by Quentin Trollip)

For this weekend, I went back to selecting a model from Quentin Trollip’s Origami Sequence. I chose the Orangutan, this time, as I still haven’t stocked up on tissue foil paper as yet. I went with Tant, but found out that the paper got too thick to fold in the last 10 steps or so, where the actual shaping is required.

This is a complex model and has around 120 steps in the folding process. To top it all, it has 2 Elias Stretches and at least 2 sinks (Open and Closed variety) which adds to the challenge. I would’ve enjoyed folding it a lot more had I kept to the author’s – Quentin Trollp – suggestion of using foil which would have made it a lot easier to fold towards the end. At least, it would have kept me from worrying about the paper tearing up. 🙂

To fold this mode, I used a 35 cm square sheet of duo colored Tant paper (brown on both sides). The pre-creasing is a lot of fun, along with the initial collapsing.

Orangutan 1 (Design by Quentin Trollip)
Orangutan 1 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

This model took me a lot of time to fold (much more than the 90 minutes set in the book anyway) because I got stumped numerous times, especially on the Elias stretches involved in the folds. I daresay, it would have been a lot easier and stress free (on the paper) if I had to fold with tissue foil itself.

One thing to be noted is that the overall size of the model when completed is about 5 inches in size (vertical). The book does mention to start off with paper measuring 50 cm in size. But I decided to try with a 35 cm square since I had stock of that variety.

Have a great week ahead…I’m sure most of you are looking forward to the short work week up ahead, with the long Thanksgiving break at the end. 😉

Sheep (Design by Hideo Komatsu)

Sheep (Design by Hideo Komatsu)
Sheep (Design by Hideo Komatsu)

This weekend I chose to fold Hideo Komatsu’s Sheep, the diagrams of which are available in Origami Tanteidan Magazine # 105. If you are interested in folding this model from a CP, you can find the CP in Origami Tanteidan Magazine # 93.

There are 112 steps in all and this model can be categorized as Complex in the level of difficulty. I used a 9 inch square sheet of Tissue fur backed with natural fur paper on one side. Both of which, I have purchased from Nicolas Terry’s origami shop, not long ago.

For the duo colored paper, I came up with a new idea this time around. I ‘recycled’ an old origami model – Román Díaz’s Oveja – to use for Hideo Komatsu’s model. What I did was to open up Román Díaz’s model, which was folded out of black colored (both sides) natural fur paper, straighten out the creases by hand and then, by placing a handkerchief over it, iron it out to smoothen the sheet. I must say this turned out pretty well and I guess it can only be done for sheets which are used for simple models. I then pasted this, using common glue, to the back of the ivory colored tissue fur paper.

This looked great when finished even though the glue took some time to dry up. Overall, I am pleased with the way the model turned out, except for the Sheep’s face – for which the paper became too thick to make any distinct folds.

How to fold this model:
JM Origami Tutorials has got a nice video on the folding sequence on his YouTube channel.

White Rhino (Design by Quentin Trollip)

White Rhino 1 (Design by Quentin Trollip)
White Rhino 1 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

I received my order of Quentin Trollip’s book – #4 Origami Sequence – this week and was faced with the usual dilemma – what to fold first from it? After a lot of deliberation, I settled for the White Rhino which the last diagram in the book. The fact that I had no good paper for the great color changes which are the hallmark for most of the models in the book was also a big factor 😉

White Rhino 2 (Design by Quentin Trollip)
White Rhino 2 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

This model is categorized as complex by the author – Quentin Trollip – and has 86 steps diagrammed to the finished model. The model is best wet folded while foil and Kami will also work. A 35 cm square sheet of paper is suggested for folding this model, colored gray on both sides.

I have used a 35 cm square sheet of Tant paper, colored gray on both sides. I have wet folded it at the end in order to give it the shape and curves. It took me around 3.5 hours to fold this model in total, and I didn’t fold it continuously during this time. This is my first fold of this model. I found the diagrams easy to follow and quite clear.

How to fold this model:
JM Origami Tutorials has a good video on the folding sequence. You should check out his YouTube channel, too – it has got a great collection of clear and easy to follow tutorials on different levels of origami models.

Wizard (Design by Hojyo Takashi)

Wizard (Design by Hojyo Takashi)
Wizard (Design by Hojyo Takashi)

Happy Halloween, everyone!

This Halloween, we went to the performance – Moulin Rouge® – The Ballet. This was the first time I attended a ballet performance and I must say I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was a 2 hour extravaganza choreographed by Jorden Morris and it truly wowed the audience. The costumes, stage set up and story were truly amazing.

I did find time to fold something specially for the dark and eerie theme this weekend. I attempted Hojyo Takashi’s Wizard from the Origami Tanteidan Magazine 109. I must say the model is complex with a 142 steps in all. It showcases color changing in the design and looks truly great when completed.

Wizard (Design by Hojyo Takashi)
Wizard (Design by Hojyo Takashi)

I am pretty happy with my rendition of Hojyo Takashi’s Wizard. When starting off I thought it would end up as a ball of crumpled paper in the waste bin. Since one would require a rather large sized sheet of paper to fold this model from, I used a 35 x 35 cm Kami (because this is the only sheet I had which was single side colored and large). I had purchased the Pack Discovery – 30 squares from Origami-Shop sometime ago and this large sheet of origami paper was a part of that pack.

I am still happy with the outcome even though the model is not wet folded at all. I found that this is one model for which the bonefolder would come in real handy. There are bits of paper which require to be squashed and folded, which made it difficult to do so by hand. Since I don’t have one as yet, I had to make do with other instruments / items which served the purpose at best.