Icosahedron Sonobe (Design by Tomoko Fuse)

Icosahedron Sonobe

I’m back to folding this summer, and I started out with a modular design from our favorite – Tomoko Fuse. Her designs are always interesting and with the right color combinations in paper, one can fold pretty kusudama.

For this particular design, it takes about 3 hours to fold and assemble at moderate pace. The individual units themselves are quite easy to fold, so its a good model to fold for folders with a little experience in folding, too.

Paper to use:
I used regular Kami paper, each of the sheets measuring 3 inches in size. These were 30 square sheets in all and single side colored. One has to start with the white side down in order to have the white color appear in between like shown in the image accompanying this post.

How to Fold the Icosahedron Sonobe:
There are many instructional videos on youtube for this model and the one I referred to and found very helpful is Tadashimori’s Instructional video. His explanations are clear and steps shown are very simple to follow.

Hope you enjoy folding this model!

Fiery Dragon (Design by Kade Chan)

Fiery Dragon (Design by Kade Chan)
Fiery Dragon (Design by Kade Chan)

Its been a long time since I folded dragons and this time I have attempted Kade Chan’s Fiery Dragon. This is my first attempt and I am quite pleased with it. I plan to fold my second rendition with metallic tissue paper so that it gives a better look when finished.

This model depends a lot on the shaping you do at the end of the folding sequence along with the kind of paper you use to achieve this. Starting with a larger sized paper is always helpful since the folds become a lot easier especially when sinks and rabbit folds are involved.

Paper to Use:
It is best to use pliable, easy to shape paper such as Tissue-Foil paper or Washi which can be easily shaped and bent to give form to the finished model. For my first attempt, I used the commonly found Tracing paper which made folding easier but shaping would be a lot better had I used Washi or tissue-foil paper. The size of the paper was a 26″ square – tracing paper which is very fine, allows for complicated folds without having to worry about the paper tearing off at stress points in the model.

How to Fold the Fiery Dragon:
Kade Chan has a wonderful blog, where he shares diagrams, tips as well as instructional videos (of his designs) made by origami enthusiasts all over the world, who have sought his permission for the instructional videos, of course. On his blog, he has shared the photo-diagrams of the finished model, clear diagrams of the folding sequence as well as multiple Instructional videos to help with folding this amazing model.

This model is a lot of fun to fold and is definitely worth the time. It took me 3 days with 3 hours spent per day to finish folding this model.

Clover Kusudama (Design by Maria Sinayskaya)

Clover Kusudama (Design by Maria Sinayskaya)
Clover Kusudama (Design by Maria Sinayskaya)

I folded a kusudama after a very long time and it took me about 4 hours in all to fold and assemble this design. The model itself looks complicated with the layered or frilly look but the individual units are pretty easy to fold once you’ve got the hang of it. I usually do not fold kusudama designs since they are time consuming and monotonous. But this time around, I found this pretty pattern and thought I would give it a try. These Kusudama designs look pretty when hung from a height or can be used as table decoration in the house.

Paper to use:
I have used 30, 3 inch square sheets of single side colored Kami paper to fold the model. I think this is the ideal size of paper to use as larger sized sheets would mean larger ‘edges’ (those half cube structures which you seen in the design) between the folds and this would make the model less compact. It is easier to manage the assembly with the units folded from these smaller sheets, too. You do not require any paperclips or pins to hold the in-progress model together while you assemble it all; you just require patience. One can use wrapping paper or any similar textured paper to fold this model. Tissue paper or extremely fine paper should be avoided.

How to fold the Clover Kusudama:
Maria Sinayskaya has diagrammed the folding sequence and also provided links to the instructional video recorded explaining this folding process. Further, she also includes color photographs of the finished model in various paper color combinations to give folders an idea of the kind of paper to use.

I found the video by Jo Nakashima pretty clear and very helpful especially where the assembly process is concerned and therefore I thought I would share it with you all, too. Jo makes the extra effort of cross referencing each step in the diagrammed folding sequence with that of the step in the instructional video, too.

Origami Stars (Design by Enrica Dray)

Origami Star (Design by Enrica Dray)
Origami Star (Design by Enrica Dray)
Altar for Our Lady
Altar for Our Lady
Origami Star (Design by Enrica Dray)
Origami Star - Top View (Design by Enrica Dray)

I folded these stars recently for a small function at home, in Goa, India. I was looking for delicate stars or flowers to fold and place around the table or on the wall and found these pretty stars designed by Enrica Dray.

As for the function, there is a tradition in Goa where Our Lady ‘visits’ all houses in a parish and is kept at home for a day before going to the next house. This tradition has been going on for years. Family members pray the Holy Rosary 5 times during Her visit during the time She is at home and all neighbors, family members and friends come to visit and partake in the prayers. Its been many years since I attended this in Goa, so I was happy that I got a chance to do so when I was visiting family during my vacation.

Paper to use:
To make these stars, I used metallic paper which I managed to purchase in Goa itself. The proprietor of the store called it Silver Metallic paper with no other special name given to it. I bought these in large sized sheets and cut them down to decently sized 6 inch squares. You can also use contrasting wrapping paper which is not flimsy or Tant or even Kami, since the folding process does not have any intricate sinks or complicated folds.

One thing, however, you should know is that if you would like to make the ‘curls’ like the version shown on Go Origami, then you would need to select your paper carefully – i.e. the kind which will allow you to easily form these curls as well as keep them in place. Washi, Metallic Tissue paper or certain kinds of wrapping paper will be good in this case.

How to Fold Enrica Dray’s Stars:
Maria Sinaskaya of Go Origami has shared the links to the diagrams as well as photo diagrams of the assembly process. These I found were clear and very helpful when folding. Further, these stars can be folded by beginners who have a little bit of folding practice, too.

For each star you need 8 square sheets of paper, and you can buy these individually of a certain size, or buy larger sheets and cut them down to the size you would like to use.

When folded (I used 6 inch square sheets of paper), the size of the star is approximately 6.5 inches.

Hope you enjoy folding these stars.

Star Helena (Design by Carmen Sprung)

Star Helena (Design by Carmen Sprung)
Star Helena (Design by Carmen Sprung)

Sara Adams posted a new instructional video and I just couldn’t wait to get started on folding it. I really like the way the star comes together with the color changing variation and the fact that this model requires only one sheet of paper to fold.

Paper to Use:
You can fold this model with Kami, tant, tissue foil or even nice wrapping paper. However, you should keep in mind that if you are going to use this as a CD or DVD cover, the paper would have to be thicker than a fine tissue paper.

I used yellow colored Tant paper and pasted a thin sheet of red tissue paper on one side in order to have a color changing design. The paper was quite alright to fold and I didn’t face any problems with the thickness.

When making an octagon, one has to be precise and as Sara reiterated in her instructional video, you have to make crisp, sharp folds and precisely, too, in order to have a perfectly folded model. If you see my finished model in the picture, you will see that some folds are slightly off, and this is because my octagon was not cut accurately.

How to Fold this Design:

The diagrams to this model can be found in Carmen Sprung’s book – 21 Origami Sterne – which you can purchase from OrigamiUSA’s The Source. Also, Sara Adams has taken the effort to record a very good instructional video on folding this design.