Snowflake (Design by Dennis Walker)

Snowflakes (Design by Dennis Walker)
Snowflakes (Design by Dennis Walker)
Snowflake (Design by Dennis Walker)
Snowflake (Design by Dennis Walker)

I came across this Snowflake design on Sara Adams’ website and found it really pretty. Even though there is still some time to go before the holiday season actually begins, I couldn’t stop myself from giving this one a try. 🙂

You can cut out a hexagon from a square sheet of paper or from an A4 size paper. Once this part is done, you can start folding your snowflake.

Paper to use:

It is advisable to start off with tracing paper or tissue paper which you use for gift wrapping. These sheets are fine, easy to fold and if you prop up the snowflake against the window pane once done, you will be able to see the sunlight filter through the layers of folds giving it a really pretty look.

I used a 10.5 inch square sheet of tissue paper – remnant from a previous origami project. From this square sheet I cut out a hexagon, with each of its sides measuring approx 5 inches in length. I did this by following one of Sara’s instructional Video of cutting a Hexagon out of a square. The final model measures about 5 to 6 inches (approx) across.

How to Fold the Snowflake:

You can fold this pretty snowflake either by following the diagrams available on Dennis Walker’s website or by following Sara Adams’ detailed instructional video on this model.

It takes around 15 minutes to fold this model without taking into account the time involved in cutting the hexagon. It is pretty simple and can be folded by beginners too.

Now to gear up for ‘The most wonderful time of the Year’!

Mushrooms (Design by Vincent Floderer)

Mushrooms (Design by Vincent Floderer)
Mushrooms (Design by Vincent Floderer)

Sara Adams found this instructional video on YouTube this week and had a post regarding it on her site. Seeing that, I couldn’t resist trying it out myself, since I was amazed by the fact that this model can be ‘crumpled’ into a mushroom in approx 2 to 3 minutes flat!

The result is absolutely stunning as the mushroom looks very life like (if you ignore the fact that its purple in my version :D).

Paper to use:
One would need to use “flexible” paper of medium thickness to create this model. The paper I chose was the plain old ’tissue’ paper which you get in gift shops or in places like Walmart and CVS which have gift wrapping sections. I still have paper remaining from the Cattleya Orchid for which I had bought this color for, so I decided to use sheets from that pack.

Size of the paper:
What I did was, I simply took out a fresh sheet of paper from the tissue pack. This was rectangular in size measuring approx (50.8cm x 66 cm) or (20 in x 2.1 ft). This is the standard measure in which these tissue packs are sold – for use in gift wrapping. As per Sara’s post you can also use a square sheet of paper of 48 cm size. I faced no issues using a rectangular sheet of paper. So I will leave the choice of the paper shape entirely up to you 🙂

How to fold the mushroom:
This particular design uses a technique called ‘crumpling’ in order to give shape and ‘life like’ appearance to objects. Vincent Floderer is famous for using this technique and designing many ingenious models, especially sea creatures.

You can check out the following instructional video by Vincent Floderer himself. I am sure you will find the video easy to follow and will soon be making your very own mushrooms. 🙂

Have a great weekend!

Manta Ray (Design by Quentin Trollip)

Manta Ray (Design by Quentin Trollip)
Manta Ray (Design by Quentin Trollip)

This weekend I chose a Manta Ray to fold, a design by Quentin Trollip, whose work I was trying for the first time. I am quite pleased with the way mine turned out even though I used single side paper, that too wrapping paper 😀

I have been debating whether to fold Quentin Trollip’s Pig or the Manta Ray for quite sometime now, considering I have the diagrams for both. I finally settled with the manta ray.

Paper to use:
I used a 30 cm (or 12 inches) approx single side patterned wrapping paper which I cut down to size. This is a specialty wrapping paper which I found in my local stores which looked pretty and was of a decent thickness. However, I would recommend using duo colored paper for this model so that you won’t have to make a few modifications to cover up the white part. Both sides should be colored the same color for best results.

How to fold this model:
I was able to get the diagram for this model off the Internet, which was posted by Origami Weekly. It is quite easy to follow and the steps are explained pretty well.

You will have to spend sometime shaping the ‘wings’ and the tail of this ray. A bit of shaping will also be required for the ‘body’ of the ray.

Have fun trying out this one! 🙂

Due Cigni – ‘Two Swans’ (Design by David Derudas)

Due Cigni - Two Swans (Design by David Derudas)
Due Cigni - 'Two Swans' (Design by David Derudas)

I came across this design last week and thought I’d give it a try this weekend, it being a long weekend and all. It’s by David Derudas and as surprising as it may look, it’s folded from a single sheet of paper! The most complex step I found in the instructions was step 7 – 8 as this particular step encompassed a tricky technique in order to get a different color on each side of the model.

What paper to use:
I used a 9″ square sheet of single side colored paper (black and white) to fold this particular model which you see in the accompanying image. You can also try duo-colored paper with each side colored a different shade. I found that a 9″ sheet produced a final model of about 5″ approx, so you can select the size of paper accordingly.

How to fold:
Pajarita.org, which is a Spanish origami site has a lot of diagrams and tips on origami. This is also where I found the diagrams for David Derudas’ Two Swans. You can find the diagram here.

Have a great weekend!

Origami Swan (Design by Hoang Tien Quyet)

Swan (Design by Hoang Tien Quyet)
Swan (Design by Hoang Tien Quyet)

I came across this elegant swan design on the Internet the other day, from a Vietnamese Origami site which is very different and a lot more elegant than my earlier attempt at folding a swan. It is designed by Hoang Tien Quyet and was featured in the Origami Tanteidan 14th Edition, too.

The model is fairly easy to fold, however, the major portion of the effort goes into shaping the swan i.e. forming the wings and curving the neck. It takes around 15 mins to fold this model, and this time includes that spent for shaping the swan.

Paper to use:

For this particular model, I used gold foil paper which I had remaining from an earlier origami project. It measures approx 4.5 to 5 inches in size. Mr. Quyet has used the wrapping paper (gold foil based sheet) found in cigarette boxes to fold his elegant model and I daresay..it’s an ingenious idea and the result is marvelous. I will attempt to fold it using the same paper shortly, but for now, I thought this gold foil origami paper would do 😉

How to fold this model:

The swan is folded in approx 20 steps and this includes the shpaing of the wings and the neck. The steps are really easy to follow. However, pay special attention to steps 8, 9 and 10 which are essentially the main steps for this swan. Notice that the “similar to” petal fold made in step 8 should be done, such a way that, the gold portion of the paper sticks out a bit and a “squarish” look is displayed on the swan’s back (corresponding to that fold). For step 9/10, there is a reverse fold which is quite tricky and a portion of the paper gets folded ‘inwards’ to create the neck.

Update as on 5th May 2010: The site which hosted the diagram to this model has been taken down/removed the diagram. I will update this post when I get a new link to the diagram.

Now, to find someone who is willing to ‘donate’ the inner wrapper of their cigarette pack to me… 😀