Butterfly, Opus 410 (Design by Robert J. Lang)

Butterfly, Opus 410 (Design by Robert J. Lang)
Butterfly, Opus 410 (Design by Robert J. Lang)

I decided to give Robert J. Lang’s Butterfly, Opus 410 a try this weekend. It’s been some time since I folded any origami and I was in the mood for something on an intermediate level. The paper I chose was regular Kami since this was my very first fold of this model.

Robert J. Lang’s Butterfly is quite different from Michael LaFosse’s design. When I first picked up Opus 410 to start, I moved quite quickly along the steps until I came to the half way mark where I started to slow down due to the numerous sink folds and swivel folds. I have certainly lost practice when it came to these intermediate folds. The model has more detail as compared to Michael LaFosse’s designs and I enjoyed folding Robert Lang’s version.

If you are familiar with Michael LaFosse’s Origami Butterflies, you will notice that there are many variations one can do to get certain wing designs and wingspan. His book explains the base to create and the variations one can make based on this. Robert Lang’s version, however, has more detail such as a more pronounced body of the butterfly, feelers and the folds are much more complicated as compared to Michael LaFosse’s.

Overall, I am happy with the outcome of my fold, inspite of using kami paper for this rendition. One improvement I can think of is to further shape and crisply crease the body of the butterfly. Given that I used kami, the folds got a bit too thick for me to do this.

Paper to Use:
Once can use any duo colored paper to fold Robert J. Lang’s Butterfly. The paper should work well with multiple folds and not be too thin as it could tear under the strain. I used a 5.9 square inch duo colored kami paper for my rendition. Note, that however, finer or thinner paper will allow you to create crisp folds and shape the butterfly better.

Insects 2

How to fold Robert Lang’s Butterfly:
The diagrams for this model can be found in Robert Lang’s book – Insects 2

Mondrian Cube (Design by David Mitchell)

Mondrian Cube (Design by David Mitchell)
Mondrian Cube (Design by David Mitchell)

Leya Torres of OrigamiSpirit.com posted this rather lovely model a few days ago and I could not resist trying it out this weekend. It is a design by David Mitchell, based on the famous Piet Mondrian painting and with the correct choice of colored paper to fold, one can achieve the same effect.

Leyla demonstrates the folding sequence using 3 colored sheets and this would give you a simple combination of two colors per side of the cube. However, in order to achieve the color combination like in the Mondrian painting, one would need to use a combination of colors and this concept has also been explained in the video, towards the end.

Paper to use:
One can use almost any kind of paper for this model, as long as its thick enough to hold a crease or edge of a cube. I have used regular kami paper measuring 3 inches in size, single side colored. The resulting model is about 2 inches in height, width and length. If you are using single-side colored paper, like I did, you would have to start with the white side facing upwards or towards you.

How to fold the Mondrian Cube:
In her detailed blog post, Leyla Torres has recorded a nice instructional video and also provides tips on folding this model.

Valentine (Design by Robert J. Lang)

Valentine (Design by Robert J. Lang)
Valentine (Design by Robert J. Lang)

This particular design has been on my to-do list for quite a while, now and what better time to fold it than February when most people are head over heels in sending out Valentine’s.

As with any design of Robert Lang, this is a great design with remarkable detail and incorporates precise folds and even color changes. I enjoyed folding this and this is, in fact, my first fold of the model.

Paper to use:
The best paper to use for this would probably be duo-colored tissue foil or even if you want to paste a contrasting colored sheet of paper to red unryu, it would make a nice sheet to fold. I haven’t tried any of these, but I would definitely think of these options the next time I fold this.

Since this was my first fold, I used common Kami paper measuring 9 inches in size, which wasn’t duo-colored unfortunately. The folding sequence involves reverse folds and small sinks ate the end in order to hold the heart together or flat, rather.

How to fold Robert Lang’s Valentine:

Origami Design Secrets - Second Edition

The diagrams to this design can be found in Robert Lang’s books – Origami Design Secrets – Second Edition.

Sara Adams has created a 4 part instructional video on folding this model. She has explained the folding sequence very nicely and provides helpful points on the tricky sinks, reverse folds and such.

Have a great week ahead!

Butterfly Bookmark (Design by Grzegorz Bubniak)

Butterfly Bookmark (Design by Grzegorz Bubniak)
Butterfly Bookmark (Design by Grzegorz Bubniak)

My better half is practically a bookworm and much to my irritation will end up folding the pages within the book so that he remembers where he left it off. I hate this habit of his, which made me hunt for creative bookmarks for him to use.

This is an incredibly pretty bookmark and is not so difficult to fold. Grzegorz Bubniak has generously provided the diagrams to this design on his website, too. It is also published in Polish Origami Bulletin # 1.

Paper to use:

Ideally this design is best folded with duo colored paper i.e. colored differently on either sides. However, single side colored paper will also work even though it might not give an all that great effect. You can select a paper – Kraft, Kami or even some pretty patterned wrapping paper – measuring approx 6 inches or more. The size of the paper you start with really depends on the size of the final model you wish you have. A 6 inch square will end up being a 4.5 inch model in the end, measured across.

Butterfly Bookmark (Design by Grzegorz Bubniak)
Butterfly Bookmark (Design by Grzegorz Bubniak)

How to fold this design:

Grzegorz Bubniak has shared the diagrams on his website. If you see the picture of the completed model there, you will notice that he has used duo-colored Kraft paper colored in gold and crimson which looks really elegant.

Floral Perpetua (Design by Dasa Severova)

Floral Perpetua (Design by Dasa Severova) - Backlit
Floral Perpetua (Design by Dasa Severova) - Backlit

A few weeks ago, Dasa Severova designed a very pretty Perpetua flower design; what’s more is that she also took the pains to take a series of photo diagrams of the folding sequence and share it with everyone.

This floral design is indeed very pretty and if you are at ease with squash folds, and multiple collapses of paper, you should be fine.

Paper to use:
For my rendition, I have used duo colored tant paper measuring 35 cms in size. You can choose to fold this design with Kami paper, tissue foil or any paper you like. Paper measuring a minimum of 9 – 10 inches should be used as this design has a series of folds which will become quite tough if you fold it using a small sheet of paper to begin with.

Floral Perpetua (Design by Dasa Severova)
Floral Perpetua (Design by Dasa Severova)

From the square, you will have to cut out an Octagon, which is what you will begin your folding with. When starting to fold, in case you are using single-side colored paper, remember to start with the colored side facing you / upwards.

The completed model of mine measures approximately 9 inches in size.

How to fold the Floral Perpetua:
Dasa Severova has generously shared the instructional album on Flickr. She has demonstrated 3 levels of collapsing / folding and she does mention that you can increase this number if you feel like it. Tips on variations are also provided by her in the folding sequence.

Have a great week ahead!