Valentine (Design by Robert J. Lang)

Valentine (Design by Robert J. Lang)
Valentine (Design by Robert J. Lang)

This particular design has been on my to-do list for quite a while, now and what better time to fold it than February when most people are head over heels in sending out Valentine’s.

As with any design of Robert Lang, this is a great design with remarkable detail and incorporates precise folds and even color changes. I enjoyed folding this and this is, in fact, my first fold of the model.

Paper to use:
The best paper to use for this would probably be duo-colored tissue foil or even if you want to paste a contrasting colored sheet of paper to red unryu, it would make a nice sheet to fold. I haven’t tried any of these, but I would definitely think of these options the next time I fold this.

Since this was my first fold, I used common Kami paper measuring 9 inches in size, which wasn’t duo-colored unfortunately. The folding sequence involves reverse folds and small sinks ate the end in order to hold the heart together or flat, rather.

How to fold Robert Lang’s Valentine:

Origami Design Secrets - Second Edition

The diagrams to this design can be found in Robert Lang’s books – Origami Design Secrets – Second Edition.

Sara Adams has created a 4 part instructional video on folding this model. She has explained the folding sequence very nicely and provides helpful points on the tricky sinks, reverse folds and such.

Have a great week ahead!

Another Shuzo Fujimoto Tessellation

Tessellation (Shuzo Fujimoto)
Tessellation (Shuzo Fujimoto)

It’s been some time since I folded and I haven’t really got into the routine of folding. I tried out this tessellation by none other than the master Shuzo Fujimoto and I quite like the way it has turned out.

There is a lot of pre-creasing required and which is expected with folding a tessellation. However, once you get the hang of the technique, its gets done pretty quickly.

 

Paper to use:

I have used a 15cm square sheet of Kami for my rendition – single side colored.  This design took me about an hour and a half to fold, but thats only because I had to reopen and fold the whole thing whilst I was half way through because of a mistake.

You can try folding this design with Tant, Tissue Foil or any other paper which is not too thick – this is because of the layers of folds which are generally associated with tessellations.

 

How to fold this design:

While no instructional video or freely available diagram exists for this model, you can nevertheless get the diagrams from the book  – Hortensia Origami –  which you can buy from Nicolas Terry’s Origami Shop.

Mette Pederson’s Modular Ring – My Variation

Medde Pederson's Modular Ring - My Variation
Medde Pederson's Modular Ring - My Variation

I was fiddling around with Mette Pederson’s Modular ring units today and came up with this design for a ‘tire’ like ring which I think looks pretty nice. This is the first time I have ever modified a design to come up with a variation and I am pretty satisfied with it. I really do not know if diagrams or this design has already been published somewhere. So if in case you do know of any, do let me know and I shall update this post accordingly.

Mette Pederson's Modular Ring Variation
Mette Pederson's Modular Ring Variation

The folding sequence is almost exactly as that of Mette Pederson’s Modular Ring and similar to Paolo Bascetta’s variation of it, too. I have modified the folds in the last step – to form angle bisectors – in order to produce this variation of the model.

This model is 3D, in the sense that it is not thin and flat. However, since the ‘edges’ of the ring are pointed it does not lie on its side very easily. I had to balance it against the wall to take a picture. The side view reminds me of a very popular origami vase design (whose designer I seem to now forget) and the alternate / rear view of this ring / tire is more ‘open’ as compared to the top side – as you can see from the pictures.

Mette Pederson's Modular Ring Variation (Alternate view)
Mette Pederson's Modular Ring Variation (Alternate view)

Paper Used:
I have used Kami paper, which is single side colored measuring 3 inches in size. This model also requires 12 sheets to form the tire / ring and is quite easy to fold.

I would like to fold this model again with larger paper so that the assembly will be easier. In this case, since I chose to try out this variation with 3 inch sized paper, it became a bit difficult towards the end – during the assembly. The units kept popping out of their slots since the ‘space’ between / towards the centre of the unit wasn’t much to accomodate movement of the units.

White Rhino (Design by Quentin Trollip)

White Rhino 1 (Design by Quentin Trollip)
White Rhino 1 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

I received my order of Quentin Trollip’s book – #4 Origami Sequence – this week and was faced with the usual dilemma – what to fold first from it? After a lot of deliberation, I settled for the White Rhino which the last diagram in the book. The fact that I had no good paper for the great color changes which are the hallmark for most of the models in the book was also a big factor 😉

White Rhino 2 (Design by Quentin Trollip)
White Rhino 2 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

This model is categorized as complex by the author – Quentin Trollip – and has 86 steps diagrammed to the finished model. The model is best wet folded while foil and Kami will also work. A 35 cm square sheet of paper is suggested for folding this model, colored gray on both sides.

I have used a 35 cm square sheet of Tant paper, colored gray on both sides. I have wet folded it at the end in order to give it the shape and curves. It took me around 3.5 hours to fold this model in total, and I didn’t fold it continuously during this time. This is my first fold of this model. I found the diagrams easy to follow and quite clear.

How to fold this model:
JM Origami Tutorials has a good video on the folding sequence. You should check out his YouTube channel, too – it has got a great collection of clear and easy to follow tutorials on different levels of origami models.

Western Pond Turtle (Design by Robert J. Lang)

Western Pond Turtle (Design by Robert J. Lang)
Western Pond Turtle (Design by Robert J. Lang)

This is yet another model from the book – Origami Design Secrets: Mathematical Methods for an Ancient Art, by Robert J. Lang – which I have chosen to fold. It uses the technique of pleating to make the “shell” design on the shell of the turtle. It is advisable that a large paper be chosen to fold this model, as the pre-creasing requires a lot of folds and patience.

I started out with a duo-colored tant sheet of paper measuring 35×35 cms which I had purchased on Origami-Shop.com. The first 20 steps of the diagram constitute the pre-creasing and has a lot of small folds to be done. This pre-creasing turned out to be the most irritating part of folding this model. 😀

The Shell - Western Pond Turtle
The Shell - Western Pond Turtle

It took me absolutely ages to fold the pleats! Robert Lang in his book, lists out 2 options for creating the creases:

Option 1 – Folding the complete set of folds in order to pleat the shell. this would mean your paper will have numerous creases which will not be used in the end.

Option 2 – Folding a portion of the set of creases and marking out the rest using a pencil or pen.

Front View - Western Pond Turtle
Front View - Western Pond Turtle

I went in for option # 2 as I didn’t think I wanted to deal with ‘extra’ creases. I am quite happy with my first attempt at folding Robert Lang’s Western Pond Turtle, even though I can still improve on the limbs of the turtle.

Back View - Western Pond Turtle
Back View - Western Pond Turtle

I chose this model as I was pretty intrigued with the ‘pleating’ technique used by Robert Lang in folding this model, and I wanted to see if I could fold one which looked half as good as his exquisite version. 🙂 Hence, I am pretty pleased with the way it turned out in the end and am looking forward to folding more from his book.