Tag Archives: Roman Diaz

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz)

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz)

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz)

This is one model which has been lying unfinished for months… so this weekend I thought I’d finish the folding sequence and see how my rendition would come out. I found this model a bit difficult to fold, to tell you honestly, and I had to thrice re-open the model entirely during my folding!

What drew me to fold this model in the first place is the mane – I really liked the way the mane of the unicorn is shaped to give it a majestic look. I wanted to fold this model in white paper to maintain the ‘pure’ look a unicorn has, hence the selection of white duo-colored tant paper.

This design has a lot of sinks, rabbit ears and an unheard of (at least for me) – a hidden ‘gusset’ which had me looking up the meaning and technique online. With 81 steps in all, this model is complex and is meant for experienced folders. The shaping of the mane, tail and the body requires wet folding and a lot of patience. 🙂

Paper to use:
I have folded my rendition of the model in Tant paper measuring 35 cms in size – square, colored white on both sides. This model is complex by nature and requires shaping – especially for the mane. The folds involved in folding this model are sinks, reverse folds, rabbit ears and a hidden gusset.

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz)

Unicorn (Design by Román Díaz) - Another View

How to fold this model:
The diagrams to this model are available in Román Díaz’s book – #3 Origami Essence – which is available at Nicolas Terry’s Origami Shop. This book has a lot of models which are really pretty and varied and a lot of them have color changes incorporated which makes it looks really great.

This is my first fold of this model and I am quite content with the result especially since I got stuck in the course of the folding sequence many times.

Ringed Tailed Lemur (Design by Román Díaz)

Ringed Tailed Lemur (Design by Román Díaz)

Ringed Tailed Lemur (Design by Román Díaz)

This is one of the designs which I had started folding a couple of weeks ago but got distracted with new paper and books and left it mid way. 🙂

I have begun to leave a lot of models folded only half-way through so I have now decided not to start off on any new designs or folding until I wrap up those.

This is a model from Román Díaz’s book – #3 Origami Essence – and is tagged as a level 4 category of designs. It is slightly complex with the numerous layered folds, rabbit ears and shaping involved. There are 61 steps in all, and this includes the shaping.

The model requires a lot of shaping at the end in order to give it a slightly 3D look. Hence, the paper you select for this design must be ‘flexible’ and allow for shaping without breaking / tearing apart at the edges. This is especially important because when you are at the end of the folding sequence, you will find that there are man layers that you need to fold through and tuck in, which if you have selected plain Kami or thicker variety, will make it very difficult.

 

I have not wet-folded my rendition of Román Díaz’s Ring-tail Lemur. Instead, I have selected special washi paper – Deluxe Washi BROWN – 10 sheets – which I purchased from origami-shop.com.

This paper is extremely ‘shapable’ and you do not need to wet-fold at all. However, errors in folding are quick to show as the gold foil on the reverse layer peels off with tension. So it’s a good idea to practice your folding before trying with this sort of paper.

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Paper to use:
While Román Díaz, in his book, mentioned that this design of his can be folded with double-tissue paper which is Duo colored i.e. beige on one side and black on the other side, I have used Duo-colored deluxe washi paper which is gold foiled on one side and chocolate brown on the other side. This paper measures 35 cms square and the final model (post folding), measure approx 7 inches in height (taking into account the curling tail) and 3.5 inches across.

How to fold the Ringed Tailed Lemur:
Diagrams to this model are available in Román Díaz’s book – #3 Origami Essence. The book is incredible and will make a good Origami book collection. There are many models to fold from this book for all levels of complexity. JM Tutorials has also created a helpful tutorial on this model, you can find it on his YouTube channel.

Buho / Owl (Design by Román Díaz)

Buho / Owl (Design by Román Díaz)

Buho / Owl (Design by Román Díaz)

I was in the mood of folding something with color changes involved and since I had the brown and yellow duo-colored paper (Kami) still available in the pack, I decided to go back to the books and pick out a design from there.

Román Díaz’s Owl is really pretty to look at once completed and is not all that complicated to fold, either. In his book – #3 Origami Essence – he mentions that a paper size of 30 cms is required and the model should be wet folded. I for one did not wet fold my rendition simply because I chose to fold mine with Kami paper instead of the suggested tant.

Paper to use:
I think you should be able to fold this model with paper slightly less than 30 cms, too. But for the effect, it should be duo colored / white on one side. You can also use unryu and tant paper combination for this model and then wet fold it at the end. Its a level 3 model as per his book – on the order of complexity.

Buho / Owl (Design by Román Díaz)

This model is 3D by nature, so towards the end of the folding sequence, it will not lie flat on the surface. There are crimps, rabbit ears and shaping involved in the folding process. It is a great design to fold, as with all of Román Díaz’s designs.

The diagrams to this model are only available in Román Díaz’s book #3 Origami Essence and it is well worth buying especially if you enjoy folding animals. There are models which are simple to fold within the book as well as complex, so pretty much, it has something for everyone.

Links: Origami Diagrams, Books

We are nearing the Holiday Season here in America, and I find myself occupied with thinking of ideas for this year’s Christmas decorations, gifts for friends and family and of course my perennial question of selecting the model to fold.

I spent a lot of time on the Internet searching for ideas and came across the following links which you might find interesting:

Gabriel Vong’s awesome collection of Origami Diagrams: He has sorted them based on levels of difficulty and some of the diagrams on this page are truly amazing. There is something for everyone – from beginner models right up to complex models such as insects.

Quentin Trollip Origami Flickr Group: This is an online group for images of finished models designed by Quentin Trollip. It is open to everyone (who has a flickr account) and has folded his work.

Crease Pattern: Roman Diaz’s Fractal:  This is an intriguing design in which the common fish and bird bases are used repeatedly to form a star like design at the end. You can find help to fold this design by using this photo diagram series as a reference when folding. Your finished model should look like this.

Shadowfolds – Chris Palmer and Jeffrey Rutzky’s new book –  This is a soon-to-be-released book co-authored by Jeffrey Rutzky and Chris Palmer. It deals with geometric designs using fabric as a medium instead of paper. This book is due for release on February 1st, 2011. The following is an editorial review by Amazon:

In Shadowfolds, Jeff Rutzky, himself an accomplished and passionate origamist, and Palmer offer detailed and fascinating information about the technique and its origins in both Moorish tile and classic Japanese origami. Palmer first encountered the elaborate mosaics of the Alhambra and became intrigued with learning to translate these patterns into folded paper. He turned for inspiration to the work of Japanese origami masters Tomoko Fuse, Jun Maekawa, Toshikazu Kawasaki and Shuzu Fujimoto, as well as to the great American origami artists Robert Lang and Peter Engel.

Oveja (Design by Román Díaz)

Oveja / Sheep (Design by Roman Diaz)

Oveja / Sheep (Design by Roman Diaz)

This is a real cute model designed by none other than Román Díaz which he has kindly shared in an online Origami Journal – 4 Esquinas (4 Corners).

The design is pretty much simple and the diagram very easy to follow. There are 21 steps in all and the model itself can be categorized as simple. This publication is planned on a quarterly format and an online version will be made available only, for now. It invites contributions from all its viewers and followers and is a Spanish language publication. All articles and diagrams if contributed in English or non-Spanish, will be translated into Spanish language and published, if chosen.

This is the first Publication which has been published and is available for a download on their blog. It contains crease patterns, articles, reports and diagrams. I am sure you will like to follow this blog!

Paper to use for this model – Oveja / Sheep:
For my model, I have chosen tissue fur which I purchased from Origami-Shop. Its a duo-colored black paper which I am trying out for the first time.

If you do not have this kind of paper, you can also use kraft paper, kami / common origami paper which is single side colored so as to give the look of a white sheep with pink ears. 🙂 I decided to make mine the black sheep 😉

How to fold this model:
Román Díaz has generously shared the diagrams to this model in this quarter’s publication of 4 Esquinas, which you will be able to download here.

I hope you enjoy folding this model.