Tag Archives: tutorial

Sheep (Design by Hideo Komatsu)

Sheep (Design by Hideo Komatsu)

Sheep (Design by Hideo Komatsu)

This weekend I chose to fold Hideo Komatsu’s Sheep, the diagrams of which are available in Origami Tanteidan Magazine # 105. If you are interested in folding this model from a CP, you can find the CP in Origami Tanteidan Magazine # 93.

There are 112 steps in all and this model can be categorized as Complex in the level of difficulty. I used a 9 inch square sheet of Tissue fur backed with natural fur paper on one side. Both of which, I have purchased from Nicolas Terry’s origami shop, not long ago.

For the duo colored paper, I came up with a new idea this time around. I ‘recycled’ an old origami model – Román Díaz’s Oveja – to use for Hideo Komatsu’s model. What I did was to open up Román Díaz’s model, which was folded out of black colored (both sides) natural fur paper, straighten out the creases by hand and then, by placing a handkerchief over it, iron it out to smoothen the sheet. I must say this turned out pretty well and I guess it can only be done for sheets which are used for simple models. I then pasted this, using common glue, to the back of the ivory colored tissue fur paper.

This looked great when finished even though the glue took some time to dry up. Overall, I am pleased with the way the model turned out, except for the Sheep’s face – for which the paper became too thick to make any distinct folds.

How to fold this model:
JM Origami Tutorials has got a nice video on the folding sequence on his YouTube channel.

White Rhino (Design by Quentin Trollip)

White Rhino 1 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

White Rhino 1 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

I received my order of Quentin Trollip’s book – #4 Origami Sequence – this week and was faced with the usual dilemma – what to fold first from it? After a lot of deliberation, I settled for the White Rhino which the last diagram in the book. The fact that I had no good paper for the great color changes which are the hallmark for most of the models in the book was also a big factor 😉

White Rhino 2 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

White Rhino 2 (Design by Quentin Trollip)

This model is categorized as complex by the author – Quentin Trollip – and has 86 steps diagrammed to the finished model. The model is best wet folded while foil and Kami will also work. A 35 cm square sheet of paper is suggested for folding this model, colored gray on both sides.

I have used a 35 cm square sheet of Tant paper, colored gray on both sides. I have wet folded it at the end in order to give it the shape and curves. It took me around 3.5 hours to fold this model in total, and I didn’t fold it continuously during this time. This is my first fold of this model. I found the diagrams easy to follow and quite clear.

How to fold this model:
JM Origami Tutorials has a good video on the folding sequence. You should check out his YouTube channel, too – it has got a great collection of clear and easy to follow tutorials on different levels of origami models.

Chef Rat and Spoon (Design by Nguyen Hung Cuong)

Chef Rat and Spoon

Chef Rat and Spoon

This is a design inspired by the animated film Ratatouille, I suppose. 🙂 This model has been designed and diagrammed by Nguyen Hung Cuong in 2008. The diagrams for this model is available in OUSA Convention book 2008 whereas the CP for this model is available on Origami Artists.

This is my first fold using the CP and following the instructions in OUSA 2008. I started out with the CP and then used the diagrams as a guide to complete the folding process. I know this is a round about method, but I was too lazy to do either one alone.

Paper to use:
I used a square sheet of copy paper measuring approx 7 inches in size. The finished model came out to be not more than 4.5 inches so I think a larger sized paper would yield better results.

How to fold the model:
Diagrams to this model are available in OUSA 2008 convention book whereas the CP is available for download on
Nguyen Hung Cuong’s Page on Origami Artists. The instructions for the spoon are only available in OUSA 2008 convention book.

Mariano Zavala also has a detailed tutorial on folding this model. It is a multi-part video series, so please take a look at this YouTube channel.

I like the way the model is designed with color change for the chef hat and the facial features. But since I used copy paper, I couldn’t show the color change in this fold of mine. This is definitely a model to fold again with a better choice of paper.

Dragon in Flight (Design by Charles Esseltine)

Dragon in Flight (Design by Charles Esseltine)

Dragon in Flight (Design by Charles Esseltine)

Dragon in Flight (Design by Charles Esseltine)

Dragon in Flight (Design by Charles Esseltine)

This weekend, I thought I’d try making homemade tissue foil paper for a change. Along with this, I thought I’d give Charles Esseltine’s Dragon In Flight a try, too. This particular dragon design is something which has been on my ‘To Do’ list for quite sometime, but the intricate folds in certain steps always got me thinking twice. This time however, I thought I’d give it a shot, for sure. I first started with making tissue foil in order to fold the dragon. This was done using the common kitchen aluminium foil and tissue paper which you get in your local gift stores which is used for gift wrapping.

How to make Tissue foil:

Sara Adams, once again has recorded a great video on this paper making process. 🙂 It is very easy to follow and most of the items required can be bought from your usual hardware store or craft shop. I myself used liquid glue used for common crafts and to spread the glue around the foil, I used a cotton ball; and these worked out fine for me.

You can view the YouTube video here – Making Tissue Foil

The most tricky part is placing the tissue paper over the foil (after spreading the glue) so as to not have any “air bubbles” between the layers. I did have to ‘undo’ some portions of the tissue foil and re-stick them. All in all, it takes a bit of patience in sticking the sheets and you got to be careful. My final tissue foil did have some air bubbles between the layers, but I used the final sheet anyway! 😀

How to fold the ‘Dragon In Flight’:

I used a square sheet of tissue foil paper measuring approx 12 inches in size. This was prepared with red tissue on both sides of the foil. I had come across this Dragon in Flight PDF diagram sometime ago and had included it in my Diagrams list which I have updated recently. Do take a peek at that page.

I also found this YouTube instructional video which shows how to fold this dragon. Its pretty easy to follow and if you use the PDF diagram along with this video, it becomes quite easy.

Origami Rat (Design By Eric Joisel)

Rat (Design By Eric Joisel)

Rat (Design By Eric Joisel)

I finally folded this model after playing lazy for more than a week. This design by Eric Joisel, is intermediate in nature and contains a lot of intricate folds. It is definitely not for the beginners in origami.

I used a 16 inch square sheet of ’tissue’ paper to fold this. Yes, you heard me right… tissue paper! Though, I am of the opinion that one can use such kind if flimsy paper to fold these kind of intermediate models, one should be aware that you need to be extra careful when doing so. A slight breeze such as if you are folding near an opened window can ruin your work completely. Also, your folds should be made carefully taking care not to tear the paper whilst doing so.

I found that with tissue paper I could easily fold the ‘head’ portion which otherwise has a lot of over lapping folds and would have been difficult if I was using the common origami paper. Shaping the model is also easier since the paper is delicate and folds really easily. Hence, I did not have to resort to wet folding or ‘spreading’ the folds in order to create the curves on the ears.

One must remember though that the final model is half the size of the sheet of paper one started out with. Hence a 16″ square sheet of paper produced a completed model of a rat of about 8″ approx.

How to fold this model:

Sara Adams has put in a lot of effort to record and upload an instructional video on this model – with permission from Eric Joisel, of course. She has explained the steps clearly and has even gone to the extent of marking out the folds where possible. I am sure you, too, will find it really helpful. You can find the videos here – Eric Joisel’s Origami Rat.

Tips on folding this model:

1) Use duo colored paper to fold the rat. Else you will find that the “white” side ‘peeps’ up in many places
2) Use a square sheet of paper preferably of a size 9 to 12 inches or more. (I used 16″ paper to fold the rat depicted in the image above).
3) Make sure all your creases are firm; use your finger nail or a hard object to flatten and firm the creases.
4) You can try wet-folding the ears to shape them. Same goes for shaping the ‘thighs’ of the rat and the tip of it’s tail.